Gail began creating jewelry to spend time with her daughter and along the way became addicted. Having been a decorative painter and the creator of the many surfaces, working with her hands gives her pleasure. She creates jewelry that is pleasing to the eye and touch, sophisticated or casual, versatile or unexpected. Gail feels jewelry or a decorative item you select makes a statement about who you are, what you value in life and it gives her pleasure to be part of that. She taught decorative painting for many years and has now diversified into metalsmithing beadwork, intaglio printing, and wire sculpture trees. Gail is a member of Women Sharing Art, Long Island Craft Guild, East End Arts, Huntington Arts Council, Gallery North and displayed her jewelry and art in all these venues as well as the Islip Art Museum, East Islip Library Art Council and the OMNI Gallery in Nassau.

 

PORTFOLIO

 

Upcoming Workshops

Location:
  • Logan Kjep

    Owner & Founder, Living Lands


  • 3:00 P | Embracing Change & Wildness for Healthy Landscapes

    We are often tasked with building landscapes that appear mature upon installation, changing minimally: a “perpetually picture-perfect” manicured aesthetic. However, the healthiest landscapes see a lot of evolution! Resilient and diverse plant communities start small, develop through ecological succession, and see dramatic transformations over time. We can design our landscapes and gardens as dynamic, changing plant communities. Utilizing native plants’ natural life spans and life cycles can reduce maintenance, undermine invasives, and maximize seasonal interest. By modeling our landscapes on dynamic natural systems, we can better plan their lush futures, and enjoy the wonder of their evolution along the way.

  • 1:30 P | Altered Sites, Adjusted Plant Lists

    Infrastructure, budgets, and nursery availability all guide designers as they look to reach their project goals. With the added volatility of climate and frequency of storms designers must use all the tools at their disposal to achieve sites that are beautiful and successful. Sometimes project sites require wholesale reconstruction and elements like suspended pavements can ensure sufficient soil volume for trees long term success. Other times site constraints restrict soil volumes or create exaggerated microclimates that require thoughtful adjustments to a planting palette. How far can a site be altered to accommodate a desired plant list? Should we instead be planting for the sites we are given? James will share select sites from the past decade of work in and around New York City and highlight the tools he and his colleagues have developed to cope with some of the most challenging projects they have faced.

  • 9:45A | Right Tree for the Right Place: Selecting and Planting Trees for the Future

    Trees are the answer when it comes to cooling the earth and cleaning the air we breathe, but all too often they are doomed from their introduction into the landscape. We will discuss common mistakes made when selecting and planting trees, selecting nursery stock, proper planting, and a selection of trees, both evergreen and deciduous for tough environments.

  • 8:45A | Tree Conservation for Construction

    Conservation of trees during construction projects is becoming ever more important as natural forest areas continue to be developed and urban areas with existing heritage trees are redeveloped. We will discuss in detail what it takes for trees to survive these projects and how designers, contractors, and arborists can work together as a team to make it happen.

  • 11:15A | Mitigating Difficult Conditions for Tree Health Management

    Urban soil is often compacted during anthropogenic activities which presents a challenging substrate for tree growth. Over the past five years, several techniques for de-compacting soil (air-spading, vertical mulching, Vogt) have been evaluated alone and in combination with soil amendments such as biochar, organic fertilizers and/or a woodchip mulch. Effects on soil quality (bulk density, organic matter, vegetation cover, cotton strip degradation, root dry mass, and earthworm counts) of a heavily compacted soil as well as tree health were monitored over five years. The aim of this presentation is to provide on update as to which treatments provided the most cost-effective long-term soil de-compaction measures for arborists.

  • 8:30A | Welcome

    Opening remarks will be made by Doreen M. Monteleone Ph.D., Arboretum Liaison, Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society and Kevin Wiecks, Director, Bayard Cutting Arboretum.

  • 4:00P | Closing Remarks & Raffle

  • James Kaechele

    Program Manager, New York City Parks Tree Time

  • Victoria Beckert

    Watercolors

  • Natural Heritage Trust

  • New York State Parks

  • Let's Connect!

    Like us on Facebook @BayardCuttingArboretum & @BayardHorticulturalSociety

  • Contact

    For additional details, contact Kevin Wiecks or Doreen Monteleone.

  • Directions

    We are located at 440 Montauk Highway Great River, NY 11739.

  • 8:30A | Welcome

    Opening remarks will be made by Doreen M. Monteleone Ph.D., Arboretum Liaison, Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society and Kevin Wiecks, Director, Bayard Cutting Arboretum.

  • Doreen Monteleone, Ph.D.

    Doreen Monteleone, Ph.D. is president of Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society. She is a Cornell Cooperative Extension Master Gardener and a regular volunteer at the Arboretum. Her professional career began with a doctorate in Coastal Oceanography, but for more than twenty years she has focused on environmental and sustainability issues in manufacturing industries. She is one of the founders of and serves on the Board of Directors for the Sustainable Green Printing Partnership, the leading non-profit accreditation organization that promotes sustainability in the North American printing industry. Dr. Monteleone is an award-winning author and has published more than sixty articles, with ten in peer-reviewed scientific journals, and contributed to five books on environmental issues and sustainability. Her passion for gardening and sustainable practices makes Doreen consider herself an all-around “treehugger.”

  • 4:00P | Closing Remarks &Raffle

    Doreen M. Monteleone, Ph.D., Arboretum Liaison, Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society

  • 3:00P | Embracing Change & Wildness for Healthy Landscapes

    Logan Kjep, Owner & Founder, Living Lands


  • 2:30P | Refreshment Break

    Upper Carriage House

  • 1:30P | Altered Sites, Adjusted Plant Lists

    James Kaechele, Program Manager, New York City Parks Tree Time 


  • 12:15P | Lunch Break

    Lower Carriage House

  • 11:15A | Mitigating Difficult Conditions for Tree Health Management

    Glynn Percival, Ph.D., Senior Arboricultural Research Manager, Bartlett Tree Research Laboratory

  • 10:45A | Refreshment Break

    Upper Carriage House

  • 8:00A | Registration and Refreshments

    Upper Carriage House

  • 8:45A | Tree Conservation for Construction

    Christopher Fields-Johnson, Ph.D., Technical Advisor, Davey

  • 8:30A | Welcome

    Kevin Wiecks, Director, Bayard Cutting Arboretum & Doreen M. Monteleone, Ph.D. Arboretum Liaison, Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society

  • Michael Runkel

    Director of Grounds, Hofstra University

  • Christopher Fields-Johnson, Ph.D.

    Technical Advisor, Davey

  • Glynn Percival

    Senior Arboricultural Research Manager, Bartlett Tree Research Laboratory

  • Kevin Wiecks

    Director, Bayard Cutting Arboretum

  • Doreen M. Monteleone, Ph.D.

    Past-President, Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society

  • HOURS

    Open Tuesday- Sunday 9:00AM – 4:00PM

  • EVENTS

    Find out more about the events happening around the Arboretum.

  • VEHICLE USE FEE

    Vehicle Use Fee is $8 per vehicle is collected from April through November using the automated-pay meters. Seniors (62+) placard and access passes can now be obtained at any of our parking kiosks!

 

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